Table 1.

Chart of diagnostic criteria and degrees of diagnostic certainty for human cysticercosis

Diagnostic criteria and degrees of certaintyCriteria
Adapted from reference 14.
Absolute criteria1. Histologic demonstration of the parasite
2. Direct visualization of the parasite by funduscopic examination
3. Evidence of cystic lesions showing the scolex on CT or MRI
Major criteria1. Evidence of lesions suggestive of neurocysticercosis on neuroimaging studies
2. Positive immunologic tests for the detection of anticysticercal antibodies
3. Plain X-ray films showing “cigar- shaped” calcifications in thigh and calf muscles
Minor criteria1. Presence of subcutaneous nodules (without histologic confirmation)
2. Evidence of punctuate soft-tissue or intracranial calcifications on plain X-ray films
3. Presence of clinical manifestations suggestive of neurocysticercosis
4. Disappearance of intracranial lesions after a trial with anticysticercal drugs
Epidemiologic criteria1. Individuals coming from or living in an area where cysticercosis is endemic
2. History of frequent travel to cysticercosis-endemic areas
3. Evidence of a household contact with Taenia solium infection
Degrees of certainty
Definitive diagnosis1. Presence of one absolute criterion
2. Presence of two major criteria
3. Presence of one major plus two minor and one epidemiologic criterion
Probable diagnosis1. Presence of one major plus two minor criteria
2. Presence of one major plus one minor and one epidemiologic criterion
3. Presence of three minor plus one epidemiologic criterion
Possible diagnosis1. Presence of one major criterion
2. Presence of two minor criteria
3. Presence of one minor plus one epidemiologic criterion